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River Marked

Mercy Thompson is a simple car mechanic, but all her life he feeling that she isn’t a common, there something unusual inside her. Mercy is a shapeshifter, a talent she inherited from her long-gone father. She’s never known any others of her kind. Until now. An evil is stirring in the depths of the Columbia River—one that her father’s people may know something about. And to have any hope of surviving, Mercy and her mate, the Alpha werewolf Adam, will need their help

Rudin

Everyone in a country house of a noble prosperous landowner, a beautiful woman of the world and fashion in her past, is waiting of a certain baron. An erudite person, an expert on philosophy, he is to present his scientific work to them. However, instead of the baron, Dmitry Nikolayevich Rudin comes… “Rudin” is the first novel of Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev (1818-1883), famous Russian novelist and playwright. When it was first published in 1856, it was considered to be merely a story. Turgenev was an expert in portraying the typical characters, but his works are also a picture of private life of the people of his country and time, their emotions and anxieties. The hero of this novel has long ago obtained the name of “superfluous man”. It is a typical meaningful phenomenon of Russian life, a well-educated man, weaved of contradiction; that is completely torn off the life of his native land, and suffers painfully from his own groundlessness. Much has changed in the course of time, bur every generation of readers continue to perceive the novel in a new way.

Right Ho, Jeeves

A novel about young English aristocrat Bertram Wooster and his manservant Jeeves. The action takes place mainly in London and the suburbs. Bertie is an idler, not radiant with wit, though a true noble gentleman. He gets into amusing scrapes; and it’s just smart and erudite Jeeves, who helps him to bail out of the situation. Not without reason the stories about Bertie and Jeeves are often called simply "the Jeeves books". Misadventures of Wooster and his indispensable faithful assistant will certainly make you one of numerous admirers of Wodehouse’s talent.

richardsons defense of the south

This volume is produced from digital images created through the University of Michigan University Library's preservation reformatting program. The Library seeks to preserve the intellectual content of items in a manner that facilitates and promotes a variety of uses. The digital reformatting process results in an electronic version of the text that can both be accessed online and used to create new print copies. This book and thousands of others can be found in the digital collections of the University of Michigan Library. The University Library also understands and values the utility of print, and makes reprints available through its Scholarly Publishing Office.

resurgam poems and lyrics

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: THE HILL-TOP I—The Hill Three trees, that top the low hill's rounded crest, Bare of all leaves, as earth of life seems bare; A sickly sun, too pale to light the west Or dry the damp that saturates the air. What did I say to her, what said she in reply— Should not our love have stood, us two, between ? How low the sun hangs in the leaden sky: Autumn is ever gray as Spring is green. II—Dreams Last night I dreamed many dreams, One, of a year ago When 'neath the sun's reviving beams The hill was all aglow; And nestling in the grass still wet I found a purple violet. She leaned against a young ash-tree, My hands the flower held; Far down the valley flowed a stream That from the hillside welled : I read my answer in her eyes— Better than words are such replies. 16 THE HILL-TOP Again I dreamed, a dream full bad, For evil spirits hovered near; Gray forms in misty garments clad— Ghosts such as haunt the dying year— They wailed aloud, "The Spring is gone, Wander abroad—alone, forlorn." Ill—Quebec The streets are narrow, the hills are steep, In the market place may no man sleep, Nor ever stop for thought. A stone shaft stands on Abraham's Plain, To mark the spot where Wolfe was slain, As he seized the prize that the great Champlain To France by conquest brought. Two tongues the people use for speech, The priests a third for prayer; And ever along the plaza's reach Is heard the sound of passing feet: The Scotch troops pace with their bare red knees By the side of nuns from the nunneries, And Padres jostle the bright red coats Of His Majesty's troops, who watch the boats, That form Quebec's small fleet. Six candles burn in the church's aisle. Here should a man find peace for a while If in no other place. He who ...

ran away from the dutch or borneo from south to north

Originally published in 1887. This volume from the Cornell University Library's print collections was scanned on an APT BookScan and converted to JPG 2000 format by Kirtas Technologies. All titles scanned cover to cover and pages may include marks notations and other marginalia present in the original volume.

russian songs and lyrics being faithful translations of selections from some of

Originally published in 1917. This volume from the Cornell University Library's print collections was scanned on an APT BookScan and converted to JPG 2000 format by Kirtas Technologies. All titles scanned cover to cover and pages may include marks notations and other marginalia present in the original volume.

rise of constitutional government in england

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER II. ENGLISH KINGSHIP BEFORE THE CONQUEST, AND RISE OF FEUDALISM. The name Heptarchy denotes a period, not a system of government. At no time were there seven regular kingdoms in England; the number constantly varied. Nor were these kingdoms united together by any real constitutional tie ; they did not form a confederation, and the only trace of union is to be found in the name Bretwalda, or wide ruler, which was given to the Christian king who happened at the time to be pre-eminent. During the heptarchy a never-ceasing struggle was going on between the kingdoms. At first Kent took the lead. This was natural, for Kent had been settled longest, had no fighting with the Britons, and quickly gained a smattering of civilization from. the continent. Kent, however, never seems to have established a recognized supremacy over its rivals; the first to do this was Northumbria. This great Anglian kingdom, well protected by the Humber and the North Sea, the Forth and the Pennine range, rapidly became powerful; and when it had beaten the Scots at Dagsestan, and the Welsh at Chester, it was far stronger than the others, and in 617, Edwin, its king, subdued all England except Kent. The supremacy of Northumbria lasted till 685, when the crushing defeat ofUNION OF ENGLAND UNDER EGBERT. 11 Nectansmere was suffered at the hands of the northern Celts. A period of disorder followed. Then Mercia, under Offa, its king, came to the front, defeated the men of Kent and Wessex, vigorously encroached upon the Welsh, established an Archbishopric of its own at Lichfield, and kept the foremost place till the death of Offa, in 796. Anarchy ensued, but in 825, Egbert, king of the West Saxons, beat the Mercians at Ellandun, and within two years every ore of the kingdoms of Kent, Sussex, Essex, East...

remonstrance against the treaty with the great and little osage indians gross

ravenels road primer for school children

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER III LOCATION THE first and most important step in practical and scientific road-building is the location or laying out of the road. By location is meant the marking on the ground of the line between such places as it is intended that the road should reach or pass through, keeping in mind constantly the requirements of a good road as to distance, nature of soil, and ascent and descent, or grade. There is an old axiom, that a straight line is the shortest distance between any two points, so that, all other things being considered satisfactory, the most direct line is the most desirable. In a level country the alignment is easy: it is simply running a line connecting the initial point and the objective points. But when great irregularities of surface interfere, it is as difficult as it is important; for the grade line — the rise and fall — must be kept in mindall the time, and it takes an instrument or the eye of an experienced engineer to determine this. Another important item of cost to be considered is the equalizing of the cuts through the hills, and the adjacent fills, or embankments, across the hollows. When the earth taken out of a cut is just sufficient to make the embankment, it is moved only once, as it is hauled from the cut to the fill; but if the cut is less than the embankment, more earth has to be hauled to make that embankment; and if the cut is greater than the embankment, the surplus or extra earth must be hauled off. So it is often the case, that a deviation from the straightest and shortest course is necessary to overcome or avoid such serious obstructions and barriers as hills, hollows, streams, swamps, or other undesirable conditions in road-building and maintenance. In other words, the road should be as straight as possible; but ...

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