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Beautiful Stories from Shakespeare

Beautiful Stories from Shakespeare is a modified by Edith Nesbit collection of Shakespeare’s stories. They are changed with the intention of adapting rather sophisticated and sometimes difficult for understanding original Shakespeare’s stories to young readers so that there would be nothing unclear for any child who wants to get acquainted with works of the writer of genius.

By Right of Conquest

George Alfred Henty was a productive English novelist and special correspondent. He is known for his historical adventure stories that were popular in the late 19th century.
The conquest of Mexico by a small band of decisive men ruled by Cortez is always considered to be one of the most romantic and adventurous feats in history. With this as the ground-work of his story Mr. Henty has involved the adventures of an English youth, Roger Hawkshaw, the only survivor of the good ship Swan, which had sailed from a Devon port to challenge the mercantile supremacy of the Spaniards in the New World. He is surrounded by lots of hazzards among the natives, but is saved by his own judgement and strength, and by the devotion of an Aztec princess. At last with the help of a certain trick he gets the protection of the Spaniards, and after the fall of Mexico he manages to regain his native shore, with a fortune and a charming Aztec bride. The book contains numerous maps, vocabularies and questions. The author succeeded to show the true reasons behind Cortez's conquest, and that’s the first thing why you will like this book.

Bruce

Albert Payson Terhune was an American writer, journalist and dog breeder. Best of all he is known for his novels about the adventures of his beloved collies and as a breeder of collies at his Sunnybank Kennels. Sunnybank was family’s summer home, but later Terhune made his permanent place of living. First Albert Payson Terhune published short stories about his collie named Lad in various general-interest magazines, such as Saturday Evening Post, Ladies' Home Journal, Hartford Courant and others.
‘Bruce’ is one of the most famous books of the writer. It’s a simple story telling of that almost forgotten times, when women were ladies, dogs were Dogs, and men were husbands first of all, but not office heroes trying to save the world. Bruce, an awesome collie, is the main character of the story. When the First World War began, Bruce was already a grown up dog. Bruce shows the questionable use of war dogs as couriers to deliver written messages back and forth to the different front lines and foxholes of the World War I. Soldiers shot at him, he gets injured, then he’s patched up sent out again. Bruce was lucky, really lucky. Because not all the dogs caught the fortune as he did. At last Bruce comes home to heroes welcome to live out his life at Sunnybank. Probably, the story may seem not that serious or even not that interesting, but it is worth reading. The book is read very easily, at one breath. The book is understandable for everyone. Kids and older young reader will be captivated by the plot, and adults will definitely appreciate the beauty of language. Although the book may seem childish, it won’t make parents fall asleep when reading ‘Bruce’ to their kids. Plenty of actions and characters keep the reader in stress.
Author reveals in his novels such old truths as loyalty, friendship, and love. That’s what little children need nowadays, in the modern world of cruelty and indifference. This book will definitely teach kids to appreciate their friends, to take care of someone they love, to forgive and to trust. Seems that book is glowing with positive emotions and kindness that Albert Payson Terhune put into it.
‘Bruce’ would be a great present for a kid, and for an adult. This book would be awesome additional material for reading lessons at school, because it impresses not only by perfect and easy language, but also by raising quite serious questions.
‘Bruce’ is the book for those who love dogs, for those who still believe in miracles, for those who still think that dreaming is not a waste of time. This book is for those, who still believe in friends and fidelity. ‘Bruce’ teaches readers to be if not fearless, but at least brave and courageous, no matter what is going on. It helps not lose faith in yourself and people you love. This book is a real book of life, if it is possible to say that.






Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War

A collection of seventy-two Civil War poems by Herman Melville, an American novelist, short story writer, essayist and poet of the 19th century. Melville dedicated this work to the soldiers who fought in defence of the United States. Based on firsthand experience, the book not only glorifies battle, but depicts the horrors and the waste brought by war. “Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War” appears to be a sorrowful and inconsolable meditation on the Civil War.

Brite and Fair

This book shares with its readers the thoughts and events in the life of the main character day by day. For example, on July 18 an old minister comes to their house and the character is sure that he will never come back again. He is going back to the unitarial church with Keene and Cele who are going to sing there in the new quire. The main character has a meeting in the afternoon in Sunday school for which he does not care much as, in his opinion, they don't learn much there. This day he also meet Ed Tole and goes horseback riding with him. He has a little red pony which Ed rides without a sadle. When the main character tries to do it, he feels like being split into two parts. His horse Nellie can trot faster than Ed's but Ed's runs faster. On July 19 he meets her uncle Robert who is in fact not his uncle but his father's. He is his grandfather's brother who is already dead. When talking, uncle Robert says that hopefully the main character will make a better man that his father. It strikes him somehow as his father also used to reproach him for mispoliteness and imbehavior. The character believes that his father is 5 times as good as uncle Robert. His mother has heard that some people do like uncle Robert and say that he is best but the main character does not belong to this kind. His father laughs at uncle Robert's words and says that he should not blame Robert for anything...

Bab: a Sub-Deb

In Chapter III called HER DAIRY the main character receives a diary from home. It is New Year's Eve with clear and cold weather. Her New Year dinner consists of roast chicken, mashed turnips, sweet potatoes and minse pie. The main character wants to record her daily events, daily thoughts and ambitions and daily life in the diary because she cannot talk to anyone else. Most of her friends either exist for the mere pleasures of the day or a bound up in resitations. Girls from Far West talk during the New Year dinner about buying a phonograph for dancing as their music teacher is sick with measles. Another example is Miss Everett who used to tell everyone that her cousin had written a play but in fact her appearance shows that no cousin of hers could write a play. The character thoughts about New Year Resolution and wants to help someone every day. Today she helped Mademoiselle with putting on her rubers. On January 2 the main character writes her French theme starting with such words "Les hommes songent moins a leur Ante qu a leur corps." Mademoiselle considers that this is not a theme for a young girl. So she writes a new one about pears. And of course, she thinks a lot about love trying to share her thoughts with the diary. She complains that presumably love has passed by her. She has had some offers of devotion but they were not what she was looking for because they most were either too young or not attractive...

Barriers Burned Away

Barriers Burned Away was written by Edward Payson Roe, one of the most popular American writers and novelists of all times. This book, published in 1873, was his first work which brought him a great success. The plot is strained and keeps the readers attentive and even a bit thrilled. It narrates about the real historical event as most of the novels creates by Roe: about the Chicago Fire and the troubles it created for ordinary people. The author does a great job not only in describing the tragedy of a fire but also in depicting the conflict between two main heroes. The book was so popular that in the 1930s the movie based on the events of this novel was shot.

bisocialism the reign of the man at the margin

This volume is produced from digital images created through the University of Michigan University Library's preservation reformatting program. The Library seeks to preserve the intellectual content of items in a manner that facilitates and promotes a variety of uses. The digital reformatting process results in an electronic version of the text that can both be accessed online and used to create new print copies. This book and thousands of others can be found in the digital collections of the University of Michigan Library. The University Library also understands and values the utility of print, and makes reprints available through its Scholarly Publishing Office.

balance the fundamental verity

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: IV No Force works aimlessly or wanders away into Extinction — Balance is Supreme in the Small, as well as in the Great, Processes of Nature — Every Physical Transformation includes Exact Equivalence and Compensation. "T T 71THOUT the axiom that ac- V/V/ tion and reaction are equal and opposite, astronomy could not make its exact predictions," says Spencer (First Principles, p. 193). As astronomy discerns the operation of the laws of balance in the remotest regions accessible to human vision, and in the most tremendous phenomena, so chemistry discovers the same accurate adjustments among the smallest particles of matter of which we have any knowledge. Lavoisier is called the founder of modern chemistry. That which distinguishes his work from the work of his predecessors is the more accurate measurement of the materials and forces which are involved in chemical changes, and a more orderly view of these phenomena as perfectly balanced interactions. His work destroyed the theory of " phlogiston," which was inconsistent with natural balance because it introduced a mystic agent — " phlogiston, the spirit of fire " — having unnatural properties contradictory of the law of action and reaction. The problem of oxidation puzzled chemists in Lavoisier's day. The rapid action of fire and the slow rusting of a metal were seen to be closely akin, but the cause was elusive. It was necessary to learn that the essential of both processes is oxygen, coming from the air or some other source; and that there is no actual loss or gain in the process of oxidation. This truth led to the broader knowledge that, in every chemical transformation, whatever disappears in one form, reappears in another;that every manifestation of force is due to a disturbance of balance among the minute, invisible p... --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

brachygraphy or an easy and compendious system of short hand

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